Category Archives: News

Phnom Penh Before Sunset

Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia, has slowly emerged as a major city in Southeast Asia over the past five hundred years, from the Khmer Empire’s decline in the 15th century through French colonization and the terror of the Khmer Rouge regime. Today, Phnom Penh is rapidly changing and is home to over 2 million people. Here is a series of photos taken in Phnom Penh before and during sunset.

Golden light streaming through the clouds in Phnom Penh.
Golden light streaming through the clouds in Phnom Penh.

 

Monks leave the ferry as it docks on the east side of the Mekong River.
Monks leave the ferry as it docks on the east side of the Mekong River.

 

A fisherman passes by the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh at sunset
A fisherman passes by the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh at sunset

 

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Cambodia Celebrates A Cheerful Water Festival After Three-Year Suspension

(November 06, 2014) With cheers and shouts, boat racers found themselves before the king again yesterday after a deadly stampede in 2010, which took over 350 lives.

A three-day water festival kicked off yesterday, with noticeable numbers of racers, but fewer audiences.

Besides the presence of King Sihamoni, Prime Minister Hun Sen, parliamentarians, and numbers of government officials in front of Chaktomuk River, the streets around Royal Palace and boat racing compound near Tonle Sap River saw very few people compared to the ceremony in 2010, when over 3 million people visited the capital.

However, the number of visitors increased later, after nightfall. Families and young Cambodians made their way to events, shopping and concerts.

Here is a link to a video clip I made for the Cambodia Daily. The video was basically made out of hand-held camera style.

 

Here are some photos I took of the boat racings yesterday.

Cambodian Journalists’ Lunch Break

October 23, 2014 (Phnom Penh) After hard work and lots of stress, we take some time to enjoy our life. Lunch break is a good time for us to share experiences, meet up, and tell jokes. Here are photos and video from one of our lunch breaks at Chnganh Chnganh Restaurant, which is run by a former reporter from the Cambodia Daily.

The video and photos were my experiments with a new camera before I take a new role at the Cambodia Daily.

 

KRT Begins Genocide Trial of KR Leaders; Civil Parties Demand Personal Reparations

October 17, 2014 (Phnom Penh) Over 200 civil parties and victims of the Khmer Rouge regime on Friday protested in front of the ECCC, a U.N.-backed war crimes court, as the court begins its second trial of Case 002, which will deal with genocide and a broad range of crimes against humanity. The protesters demanded $13,500 each for their suffering and losses during the regime.

Most of protesters were unhappy that that the court and the Cambodian government paid very little support to victims compared to what is being given to imprisoned Khmer Rouge leaders. Below are the photos I took during the protest on Friday. The link will take you to a New York Times story I contributed to. (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/18/world/asia/khmer-rouge-leaders-genocide-trial.html?_r=0)

 

Opposition Lawmakers Take Oaths

August 05, 2014

(Phnom Penh, Cambodia) 55 elected lawmakers from Cambodia National Rescue Party took oaths on Tuesday to be complete lawmakers to end a year-long political stand off in Cambodia. Here are some snapshots in front of Cambodia Royal Palace.

Occupy Central for Hong Kong Democracy

July 1, 2014

(Hong Kong) Thousands of protesters marched through busy bustling Hong Kong’s streets to demand full democracy from the Chinese central government and marked the 17 anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover to China.

The group, which was organized by local activists group, Occupy Central with Love and Peace, was gathered at Victoria Park in Causeway Bay early this afternoon before marching toward Central District.

“Say no to fake democracy,” one of the pro-democracy protestors said from the group’s platform in Central. “President Xi Jing Ping, this is the message that want to send: ‘we want the real democracy’.”

Hong Kong’s activists and local groups recently claimed Chinese central government has increasingly put greater pressure on Hong Kong democracy and press freedom.

Continue reading Occupy Central for Hong Kong Democracy

Balikbayan Boxes, the gift from Hong Kong

It is hard to be away from home, but most of Filipino domestic helpers know their ways to keep in touch with family members back home. They usually send back some requesting stuffs to their family from Hong Kong in a box called Balikbayan box, a special term in Filipino.

How do they send? What kind of stuffs do they?

Here is a video package that I did with my teammates. I did majority roles in videography, editing, and some script editing. Most of camera pieces were on handheld.

In the line between riots and armed forces

Another terrifying moment as a journalist in Cambodia, I witnessed the violence during the minimum wage protest in Phnom Penh on January 3rd, 2014. At least five protesters were shot to death and dozens of them were beaten up near one of the biggest garment factory industry areas in Phnom Penh.

I was caught in the middle of violence in Phnom Penh on January 3rd with my journalist friend. Luckily, we were not beaten up, but four men, who hid behind us, might not be that lucky. As military police arrived, the explosion of smoke grenades and gun fire could be heard everywhere. Even though, they claimed as citizens and pedestrians, the four men were chased away from journalists. As results, we had ours articles on the New York Times and Al Jazeera’s website later, but what about them?

Below are some of the best photos that I took from the violence scene.

Hong Kong Goes Higher for Farming

December 06, 2013

(Hong Kong) While skyscrapers have taken over the majority of productive land in Hong Kong, some young Hong Kong citizens are going higher to create their own private farms.

“It’s a place for growing. For me, it’s kind of a place to escape, relax, and take care the garden,” said a 31 year-old business consultant Anthony Ko, who spends most of his weekends taking care of his model rooftop farm in Yau Ma Tei, a bustling business district of Hong Kong.

Anthony Ko is one of the four young co founders of Hong Kong Farm, a non-profit rooftop farming project in Hong Kong, which conducts regular workshops to train Hong Kong people in farming techniques and teach them how to make use of their available rooftop space.

Established two years ago, the Hong Kong Farm project is one of a few successful rooftop farming projects that aim to introduce modern urban farming to Hong Kong and promote awareness of organic farming to modern young people in Hong Kong.

“The idea is to connect people to nature,” said Mr Ko, adding that young people in such a big city have very few opportunities to experience nature and the way that farmers work.

The population of Hong Kong reached 7.15 million last year, but the vast majority of the city’s food supplies are imported from mainland China and other countries.

According to the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Hong Kong has over 2,500 farms, but they are able to supply only 2 percent of the fresh vegetables in local markets, while over 98 percent were imported.

Therefore, the Hong Kong government and the private sector have been working to promote awareness of organic farming and local products.  

AFCD has also encouraged Hong Kong farmers to turn to organic farming and seek other means to extend their farming activities. By June 2013, according to a report from AFCD, Hong Kong had over 460 organic farms.

The University of Hong Kong has become one of many private entities to promote local farming. The Rooftop Farming Project, which has been planting crops since June, was officially launched last month to promote the idea of sustainable development and organic farming to students.

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With just plastic boxes and compost soil, many vegetables—including salad greens, tomatoes, herbs and bitter melons—can been grown. The vegetables in the university’s project are now growing so well that they have entirely taken over the broad concrete floor of the Runme Shaw building in a massive swath of green leaves and stems. Continue reading Hong Kong Goes Higher for Farming